Film: Ink (2021)


It was while producing these images for the Kick-About No.18, that I picked up the wrong sort of marker pen, which reacted to the spritzing of alcohol in some fascinating ways. I noticed how the solid lines of ink blossomed unexpectedly into a squirm of tendrils or fine feathery hairs. I noticed too how some consequence of the varying drying times of the ink and the alcohol produced a creeping tide-mark that moved across the surface of the tile – before suddenly retreating again. It was a bit like observing some organism in a petri dish or under a microscope. Suitably-inspired, I set about capturing these evolving ‘Art Forms’ through time-lapse photography.


Photographing the interaction of the ink and alcohol taking place on a ceramic tile, frame-by-frame.


With Ernst Haeckel’s beautiful and often bizarre zoological illustrations as my prompt, it was difficult not to think about images of virology and bacteria (I suspect the global pandemic might have something to do with it too!) and my affection for the b-movies of the 1950s surfaced as quickly, producing something moodier and more ominous than I’d originally planned. 

What’s fascinating is a technique, which previously gave rise to a sort of image suited to tasteful greetings cards, should now produce something so tonally different. However, given what we know about some of Haeckel’s other ideas, perhaps the underlying menace is not so wide of the mark.

The many individual photographs comprising the film were originally in colour, but I ultimately took the decision to produce the finished film in black and white. It was one of those instances when the sum of the film won out over its parts, with the music and the vintage flicker of the images crying out for monochrome. I’ve included the colour alternate version here for your curiosity.




10 thoughts on “Film: Ink (2021)

  1. This reminds me of the scene near the start of the film ‘Don’t Look Now’ with Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie.
    I have done something similar on silk but the ink does not move as fast as this.

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  2. Those are wonderful Phil. I love them both. Ink is my absolute favourite medium both in colour and B&W. looking at the two films running at the same time I seem to like best the B&W as still images and the colour as moving film. Just running a class on colours and maybe thinking of the innate dynamic and synergy they have it makes the colour film quite special.

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